FARS Code Adoption

Adopting a FARS code is a straightforward process. It requires an understanding of the local codes that can be adopted under the laws of your state, a clear view of new construction planned in your jurisdiction that supports the need for FARS, and the development of a code adoption timeline and plan.

We're here to help you through the process and provide you with the resources you need to be successful.

Click the links below to our Code Adoption Guide and Code Adoption Checklist to learn more.

Questions?  Email us at contact@aircoalition.org.

Frequently Asked Questions

Case Studies

Below are some case studies from cities across the United States and in Canada that have embraced FARS. They include FARS code trailblazers like the Phoenix Fire Department, a regional approach to FARS by the North Central Texas Council of Governments, and a high-profile FARS retrofit in Montreal.

Phoenix, AZ

Tragic Loss of a Firefighter Leads to One of the United States’ First FARS Codes

In 2001, Phoenix Firefighter Brett Tarver ran out of air in a supermarket fire, became disoriented, and died just 75…

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Meridian, ID

Commercial Construction Community Takes Pride in State’s First FARS Installation

It was 2021, and Meridian, ID Fire Chief Kris Blume knew the push toward successful adoption of a FARS code…

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North Central Texas Council of Governments

Inclusive Regional Code Process Supports Responsible Growth and Ensures the Safety of Firefighters and Citizens

The North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is made up of local public- and private-sector code professionals dedicated to…

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Frisco, TX

Frisco Fire Department is the First in Texas to Use FARS in a Working Fire

In 2019, a slate of new construction projects was coming online in Frisco, TX. One of the largest was a…

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Montreal, Québec, Canada

Iconic Montreal Olympic Tower is Retrofitted to Become Canada’s First Building Equipped with FARS

When it opened in 1987, the Montreal Tower was heralded as an architectural and engineering landmark, soaring 547 feet above…

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